The Seven Principles

 

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December 26th is the first day of Kwanzaa.

I love Kwanzaa, not necessarily for the traditions, but they are beautiful. I love that  Kwanzaa brings a cultural message which speaks to the best of what it means to be Black but most importantly what it means to be human in the fullest sense. It reflects the best of positive thought and practice in its reaffirmation of the dignity of the human person in community and culture, and the well-being of family and community.

 I dig it.

In 2017 as we focus on fighting for justice and equity in this world, let us use the principles of Kwanzaa to guide, direct, sustain and comfort us.

Kwanzaa is a celebration of the family, community, and culture which first forms us, names, nurtures and sustains us, and teaches us uplifting ways to understand and assert ourselves in the world.

Our foundation, our rock, our source and our bond.

Kwanzaa teaches and cultivates cultural grounding and principles and practices dedicated to the cooperative creation and sharing of good in the world.

We do not stand alone….not ever. 

Kwanzaa gives us the  Nguzo Saba, the seven principles. They serve as a necessary foundation and framework for grounding and guiding our relationships and community every day of the year.

Principle #1  Umoja (unity) calls on us to strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.  We are urged to recognize and respect the foundation and nurturing framework of family and community; the relatedness and interdependence of the peoples of the world; and a profound sense of oneness in and with the world. We laugh together, we cry together, we support one another and we build real community together so that no one gets left behind.

Every day I will share a principle with y’all. I ask that you join me in using these principles  as the foundation for your days, your work, your institutions and organizations and the life you design for yourself.

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